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West Coast Rare Books

West Coast Rare Books

Westport / Ireland

White, The Natural History of Selborne.

White, The Natural History of Selborne.

White, Rev. Gilbert. The Natural History of Selborne. Observations on various Parts of Nature; and the Naturalist’s Calendar. With Additions by Sir William Jardine. New Edition, with eighteen Engravings, by Branston. London, Whittaker, Treacher & Co., 1833. 17 x 11 cm. vii, 440 pages. With 18 engraved Plates – Complete. Original dark cloth. Hard cover with leather label and gilt title on spine. Very good condition. Binding rubbed and bumped. Spine discoloured. Edges and end papers age darkened and mildly foxed.Occasional mild foxing throughout. Bookmark of previous owner (‘Haughton’) on front paste down. Signature of previous owner (‘James Haughton’) on title page. Name of other previous owner (‘Proinseas Ni Chathain’) on front free end paper, dated 1971.

From the Library of Próinséas Ní Chatháin with her signature of front free end paper, dated 1971:
Ní Chatháin, (Máire) Próinséas (1936 – 2018), was an Irish scholar, academic and lexicographer, who made substantial contributions to the Royal Irish Academy’s Dictionary of the Irish Language (a dictionary of Old and Middle Irish) and held the position of Professor of Early and Mediaeval Irish at University College Dublin.
Ní Chatháin studied at University College Galway (now NUI Galway) under Kathleen Mulchrone, where she received a B.A (1956), received a Travelling Studentship from the National University of Ireland to study in Bonn, and then studied at the University of Edinburgh where she received a PhD in 1966. She was a Scholar at the School of Celtic Studies of the Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies between 1962 and 1965, and twenty-five years later sat on the governing board of that School (1987-88). She began her teaching career as a visiting lecturer at the University of Pennsylvania and subsequently joined the Old Irish Department of University College Dublin in 1967, where she rose from assistant lecturer to professor over the course of the next twenty years. There she established an interdisciplinary M.Phil with the historian Professor Francis John Byrne and later was involved in establishing an undergraduate course in Celtic Civilisation. She held the position of President of the Royal Society of Antiquaries of Ireland from 1997 to 2000. In 2002 she was honoured with a festschrift entitled Ogma: essays in Celtic studies in honour of Próinséas Ní Chatháin, edited by her former colleagues Michael Richter and Jean-Michel Picard (Wikipedia).

From the Library of James Haughton, with his Ex Libris and signature on title page:
Haughton, son of Samuel Pearson Haughton (1748-1828), by Mary, daughter of James Pim of Rushin, Queen’s County (now County Laois), Ireland, was born in Carlow and educated at Ballitor, County Kildare, from 1807 to 1810, under James White, a quaker. After filling several situations to learn his business, in 1817 he settled in Dublin, where he became a corn and flour factor, in partnership with his brother William. He retired in 1850. Although educated as a Friend, he joined the Unitarians in 1834, and remained throughout his life a strong believer in their tenets.
He supported the anti-slavery movement at an early period and took an active part in it until 1838, going in that year to London as a delegate to a convention. Shortly after the Temperance campaigner, Father Mathew, took the pledge, 10 April 1838, Haughton became one of his most devoted disciples. For many years he gave most of his time and energies to promoting total abstinence and to advocating legislative restrictions on the sale of intoxicating drinks.About 1835 he commenced a series of letters in the public press which made his name widely known. He wrote on temperance, slavery, British India, peace, capital punishment, sanitary reform, and education. His first letters were signed ‘The Son of a Water Drinker,’ but he soon commenced using his own name and continued to write till 1872. In association with Daniel O’Connell, of whose character he had a very high opinion, he advocated various plans for the amelioration of the condition of Ireland and the Repeal of the Union but was always opposed to physical force. He was one of the first members of the Statistical Society of Dublin, 1847, a founder of the Dublin Mechanics’ Institute, 1849, in the same year was on the committee of the Dublin Peace Society, aided in abolishing Donnybrook Fair 1855, and took a chief part in 1861 in opening the Botanic Gardens at Glasnevin on Sundays. He died at 35 Eccles Street, Dublin, on 20 Feb. 1873, and was buried in Mount Jerome Cemetery 24 Feb. in the presence of an immense crowd of people (Wikipedia).

Our price: EUR 50,-- 

White, The Natural History of Selborne.
White, The Natural History of Selborne.
White, The Natural History of Selborne.
White, The Natural History of Selborne.
White, The Natural History of Selborne.
White, The Natural History of Selborne.

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